Fly Higher than Fractional: The Benefits of a Jet Linx Private Jet Card Membership

Sep 16, 2015 | Private Jet Travel

Owning a private jet is a luxury few can afford, but is desired by many. Fractional jet ownership sounds like a great solution: on paper, you only pay for what you need. In the Winter 2015 issue of SOAR, we explored the differences between fractional and total jet ownership and how to make the best decision between the two options. In this issue, we take a hard look at the variances between using a jet card and fractional private jet ownership to help you make the best decision for yourself or your company.

“It’s all about customer service,” said Scott Wilbanks, Vice President of Sales for Jet Linx Atlanta. Jet Linx’s local business model includes a local Base President, local client service teams and local pilots. “Local service is a big advantage in our Jet Card program, and a unique plus to our business model,” added Hunter Musselman, Director of Jet Card Sales at Jet Linx Indianapolis. “With local terminals around the country, our Jet Card functions as a hybrid where you get the same national guarantees as the fractional companies offer, including hourly rates and availability, and the opportunity to meet face to face with your Jet Linx team every flight.” Jet Linx also operates at the highest standards of safety, and has received the Wyvern Wingman Operator Award, ARGUS Platinum Safety Rating and IS-BAO Certification. “Each Jet Linx aircraft has a dedicated crew,” Musselman added. “The pilots don’t float between aircraft so they get to know the airplane like you get to know your car. Fractional pilots float between aircraft, the same as commercial pilots.”

private-jet-boardingIn addition to the benefit of a high-touch client experience with a Jet Linx Jet Card, the cost difference can add up quickly. “Our Jet Card provides ease of entry with minimal hourly rates and no long term purchase commitment,” Wilbanks explained.

“Since its inception, the fractional model has required the cost of capital to purchase a set amount of hours on the aircraft and required a monthly management fee regardless of if you’re flying or not,” Musselman noted. “A fractional owner is still responsible for paying the hourly rate, fuel surcharge, and federal excise tax (FET) on a flight by flight basis. Another variable to consider is the aircraft depreciation over the typical 5-year term in a fractional arrangement. Similar to owning a car, the owner is responsible for the loss of value over a given period of time. Our Jet Card allows you access to unlimited, guaranteed hours on a pay as you go basis without being responsible for any long term commitments.” Wilbanks pointed out another line item cost with each fractional share. “The fractional customer needs to pay a re-marketing fee after five years to exit the fractional share at what is then the current value of the aircraft,” he stated.

When weighing the decision whether to purchase a jet card or a fractional jet share, certain questions should be asked to ensure the best decision is reached. Consider the differences during your time flying on the aircraft. “You should identify how many hours you’ll need to fly,” Wilbanks recommended. “If you don’t know how many hours of access you’ll need to fly privately over the next five to seven years, it would be tough to make a case that the fractional model would be right for you.” Musselman advises taking a hard look at the terms of the fractional agreement to ensure agreeable terms. “A buyer that is looking at the fractional model versus a jet card needs to understand the exit provisions of each option,” he said. “You should also ask how the aircraft value is determined. What is the re-marketing fee? Do I need to sell fractional share myself? With the Jet Linx 25-hour Latitude Jet Card, you will have the freedom of a fully refundable option.”

In certain instances, a fractional share in jet ownership is absolutely not the right decision for the consumer. “If you don’t have the upfront capital free to make the purchase, or if you don’t know if you can 100% commit to flying the number of hours in the fractional agreement on an annual basis, you should not purchase a fractional share,” Wilbanks said. Musselman sees a similar equation. “You should not consider a fractional share if you are flying for personal reasons or are flying under 100 hours year,” he said.

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